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Stop coal – protect the climate!

Escrito por Anto Calle el . Publicado en Blog (english)

 

Call Out

We are the investment risk!

Ende Gelände (Here and no Further) for lignite coal in Lusatia: climate justice in action!

In 2016, the farewell to coal continues: Vattenfall, owner of the coal field in Lusatia is trying to sell its German lignite coal branch. This is a unique chance to finally close down opencast pits and coal power stations and to show that it is possible to phase-out coal in a socially and ecologically responsible manner.

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Yet, Vattenfall is only looking to sell: A new investor is supposed to carry on the centralistic, destructive energy system for decades to come. This deal would be the biggest investment in coal in the whole of Europe – meaning more resettlements, new power stations, pollution of drinking water and climate disaster.

Lusatia is an example of how climate politics are run at the moment: Everyone pretends to want the end of fossil fuels, yet no-one actually works on keeping them in the ground. Climate summits declare the transition to renewables and still the same governments effectively donate hundreds of billions of subsidies to the fossil fuel industry. The German government talks about climate protection – and spills gold on old power stations of RWE and Vattenfall. And Great Britain makes a big declaration on the farewell to coal – just to invest in fracking and nuclear energy. „Green growth“ is supposed to somehow make the difference.

We say: That’s enough! Do not sell, but rather put an end to coal – „Ende Gelände“! If Vattenfall wants to close its business in Lusatia just to leave the dirty job to someone else, we will put our foot in the door. And we will step on the toes of the leaders in current climate politics. For we can neither wait for nor trust in politics.

We will be standing where the diggers have to stop. We demand: End coal now! And we know: That’s manual labour. Hundreds of us will shut down the coal mining in Lusatia in a mass action of civil disobedience. Anyone, whether experienced in activism or not, can take part in the action – together we will stop the diggers.

We have come to stay. Last year 1500 people entered the pit of a lignite coal mine in Rhineland. This year we are coming to Lusatia, where people have struggled against mining and resettlement for years. And we will send out yet another signal against the lignite coal madness! Even if our actions are not legal – they are by all means legitimate. As time is running out: If fossil fuels do not stay in the ground now, the catastrophic consequences for millions of people can hardly be avoided.

We are everywhere. The fight against lignite coal mining in German and Polish Lusatia is part of a global struggle. Around the world people are fighting against fossil fuelled capitalism. They are stopping coal power stations in India, pipelines in the US, coal ports in Australia, fracking in Brazil and oil drillings in Nigeria. While the global North is heating up the climate crisis, its countries can also still best adapt to it. In the global South, in contrast, climate change is destroying the livelihoods of millions of people. Many of them die on the borders of Europe. They fall victim to a racist border regime, aimed at keeping the consequences of climate change out. Fighting against the root causes of migration also starts in Lusatia. Climate justice now!

We want it all: the end of fossil fuelled capitalism! We are not just fighting against coal, against fracking and oil, but we fundamentally challenge the logic of profit and madness of growth. Based on these, wrong solutions such as market mechanisms, large-scale projects and the continued exploitation of the global South are being promoted. While a few energy corporations are thriving and pampered with subsidies, the same companies disconnect 350.000 households from power supply every year in Germany alone – pretending to their own employees that coal mining will continue forever. And yet, the staff is crucial for a just transition. We need a plan, as a society, how to organise and finance a social and ecological transformation – beyond the logic of capitalistic profit. We all carry the consequences of energy politics and so we all want to take part in decision making: We ask for a democratically organised energy supply!

We are the investment risk! Whoever buys the lignite in Lusatia will get our resistance as part of the package. The more we are and the bigger the protest, the less attractive the lignite, the cheaper the price and the less likely the deal. Nothing has been decided yet. Together we can stop the deal and make Vattenfall shut down the pit: The time for coal is over. So let’s enter the pit and increase the risk.

In May 2016 we say: Let’s get going! “Ende Gelände” in Lusatia!

 

Signatories

 

  • 350.org
  • Aktionsbündnis Graz
  • Animal Climate Action
  • AntiAtom Bonn
  • AntiAtom Berlin
  • Anti-Atom-Bündnis-Niederrhein
  • Anti-Atom-Büro Hamburg (AAB-HH)
  • Attac Deutschland
  • Attac Berlin
  • Attac Degrowth AG
  • ausgeco2hlt
  • BI “Saubere Umwelt und Energie Altmark”
  • Climate Strike
  • Ecoar Global
  • Förderverein Wachstumswende
  • gegenstromberlin
  • gegentrom hamburg
  • Grüne Jugend
  • Infoladen Paderborn
  • Informationsgruppe Lateinamerika (IGLA), Wien
  • Initiative Brokdorf-akut
  • Initiative Europäische Energiewende
  • Initiative Ökosozialismus
  • internationale sozialistische linke (isl)
  • Interventionistische Linke (iL)
  • Jugendnetzwerk für politische Aktionen (JunepA)
  • Kampagne gegen Tierfabriken
  • KlimaAktion Mainz
  • Klimabande Tübingen
  • Klimagerechtigkeit Leipzig
  • Leave it in the Ground Initiative (LINGO)
  • Leipziger Ortsgruppe der Tierbefreier
  • Linksjugend [‘solid] Bundesverband
  • Linksjugend [‘solid] Brandenburg
  • Beauftragtenrat der linksjugend [‘solid] sachsen
  • Mastanlagen Widerstand
  • Netzwerk Wachstumswende – AG Degrowth und Kohleausstieg
  • No Lager Osnabrück
  • Revolutionär Sozialistischer Bund – IV. Internationale (RSB)
  • Tierbefreiung Hamburg
  • Tierbefreiungsoffensive Saar e. V. (TiBOS)
  • transact!
  • UniSolar Potsdam e.V.
  • Uwe Hiksch, NaturFreunde Deutschland
  • YASunidos

 

 

Open letter to protect the Tagaeri and Taromenane people

Escrito por Anto Calle el . Publicado en Blog (english)

 

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October 12, 2015

 

Economist, Rafael Correa D.

PRESIDENT OF ECUADOR

Engineer, Jorge Glas E.

VICE PRESIDENT OF ECUADOR

Dr. Lorena Tapia

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT

Dr. Ledy Zúñiga R.

MINISTER OF JUSTICE AND HUMAN RIGHTS

Dear Sirs & Madams,

We wish to express our profound concern with the Ministry of Environment’s pending decision to license oil block 55, (commonly known as “Armadillo Country”) an area which saw the deaths of both Hector España and Luis Castellanos in 2005 and 2008 respectively. The area is home to “Indigenous Peoples Living in Voluntary Isolation” whose presence in this region has been documented by more than 5,000 reports and testimonials (many of them recent) including those by the Ministry of Environment and the government’s own “Protective Measures Plan.” Be warned that petroleum operations in this area of block 55 would be fatal both for the Indigenous Peoples living there in voluntary isolation as well as the credibility of your government and its recognition of the rights of the Tagaeri and Taromenane.

Remember that according to the “National Policy on Indigenous People living in Voluntary Isolation” the state must:

  • •Guarantee the ancestral ownership of the territories in which these people live and on which they depend for their subsistence and the sanctity of both.
  • •Guarantee their mobility according their own cultural patterns
  • •Understand that the presence of the Tagaeri, Taromenani, and others living in voluntary isolation, requires that vast areas of the Yasuní National Park must be preserved in good condition.
  • •Ensure that extractive activities in Amazonia will never lead to their extermination nor be justified as “inevitable collateral damage.”

“Strategic Lines for Action” establish as an obligations: “To reinforce and strengthen the principle of inviolability” and mentions as a priority that: “In the future a new territorial design will be supported that will prevent fossil fuel operations within the zone of influence and territory occupied by Tagaeri and Taromenani”

In addition, the recommendations in the Inter-American Commission’s 2013 Human Rights report about “Indigenous People in Voluntary Isolation and Initial Contact on America,” declares in a section on Natural Resources that the state must “abstain from granting licenses or authorizations for activities related to natural resource's extraction, like mining, hydrocarbon activities, deforestation, farming, agroindustrials, and others, in areas with presence or transit of Indigenous People in Voluntary Isolation and initial contact, included buffer zones”

Obviously, the sensible, correct, lawful and Constitutional act would be the definitive closure of 55 Block (Armadillo), the cancellation of all concessions issued in this zone extending the Tagaeri Taromenane Intangible Zone into this block, and whatsmore, aim to define and achieve a territory that protects, forever, the integrity and fundamental human rights of Indigenous peoples living in Voluntary Isolation, preventing an imminent ethnocide.

“One more hole inside Yasuní, one less day for the existence of the Tagaeri and Taromenane”

 

[1] The Ministry of Environment and Ministry of Justice, Human Rights and Religious Affairs, was sent in April 2013 map (http://bit.ly/1LmSnht) where the location PIAV four groups identified, including "Armadillo Group".

[2] "National Policy for the Peoples in Voluntary Isolation"; Government of the Republic of Ecuador. Pp. 6, 7

[3] "Indigenous peoples in Voluntary Isolation and Initial Contact in the Americas" section on Natural Resources "; American Commission on Human Rights. Pp. 81

 

 

Sincerely

YASunidos

Jorge Herrera

Franco Viteri 

Raúl Moscoso  

Fernando Ponce 

Ramiro Ávila Santamaría 

Alberto Acosta 

Aurora Donoso 

Julio César Trujillo     

Esperanza Martínez 

Carlos Pérez  

Elsie Monge

Alexandra Almeida 

José Proaño 

Ivonne Yánez

Milagros Aguirre

Joan Martínez Alier 

Carlos Larrea

Katy Álvarez 

Nina Gualinga             

Laura Rival

Christoph Baumann   

Carlos Andrés Vera   

Roque Sevilla

Blanca Chancoso

Nidia Arrobo

Comité de Derechos Humanos de Orellana

Walter Mena- Presidente Sociedad Ecuatoriana de Medicina Ecológica

Colectivo ARTOS de Manta

Pablo Cardoso

Daniel Pérez Creus

Ongd AFRICANDO

Rebecca Zehr

Irene Donoso Vallejo

Fernando Larrea

Vicente Martínez

Michelle Báez

Leandro Velasco

Guadalupe Rodríguez


Salva la Selva

Philip Gondecki

Charlotte Gengenbach

José Gabriel Rivas Ducca, biólogo-ecologista- Costa Rica

Julio César Maya G.- Corporación La Ceiba

Blandine Gravelin

Jorge Corral

Emilio Chong-  ActivismoGlobal

Movimiento Ecologista de Mujeres del Sur

Comité de Derechos Humanos de Orellana

Cabildo por las Mujeres de Cuenca

Yasunid@s - Guapondelig

Frente por la Salud de los Pueblos – Azuay

Fernando Pico

Alessandra Dirani Aguilar

María José Racines

Econ. Diana Sharom Cabrera Montecé MSc.
Drte. Ciencias Económicas
Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana – México

Carmen Seco Pérez

Aída Quinatoa

María Moreno de los Ríos

Alfredo E.Calcagno – Argentina

Alfred Henkel - Alemania

Fausto Valero Alvarez - Ballenita Sí . Organización Comunitaria

Verónica Potes

Rebeca Donoso C.

Sara Silva Rodríguez 

Melissa Moreano

Victoria Carrasco

Eugenio Bayancela

Rafael Vasconez

María Belén Moncayo

Miriam Hinkelman, United Staes of America

Sandra Flemisch

Eulalia Carrasco Andrade

Sara Cordeon

 Chloé Mecqinion

Jorge Iván Reyes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oil Stained Tears

Escrito por Anto Calle el . Publicado en Blog (english)

 

Have you heard about the thousands of people in Ecuador that have, and are still developing and dying from cancer, and other chronic illnesses? These are the same people living in or around oil towns. The same people whose water has been polluted with over 18.5 billion liters of formation water that is highly toxic. It's an issue in a little country that nobody really acknowledges. The rest of the world doesn't acknowledge that beautiful, diverse forests are being cut down, towns are being built, water is being contaminated, and people and animals are dying. Ecuador contains some of the most biodiversity areas of rainforest in the world, a big oil reserve right under it, and some of the few amazing original uncontacted cultures left in the world. One of these being the Yasuni National Park. I have personally experienced, and spent time in these forests, and with these people and learned about their cultures. I have also had personal experiences with people in areas that have had oil contamination affect them and/or their family members’ lives greatly. I felt the connection the people of the Yasuni felt with the environment around us. It's a beautiful thing to think of how they know the forest like the back of their hand, how they can identify every plant and animal at a glance, and how they can mock the noises of the animals to communicate with them. It is terrible to think of how this beautiful place and the beautiful people could soon be dying from the effects of oil drilling that is soon to be happening and how just because they are a small country, without any true enforcement of protection of the people, and without a loud voice, it's okay to destroy everything. We realize that even small things, or the beginning of the process of the destruction, like a helicopter flying over, can disrupt the environment. A helicopter flew over the forest while we enjoyed our fifth hour in a ten person canoe, watching the monkeys jump from tree to tree, as our friend Abel, was communicating with them. The minute the noise of a helicopter was able to be heard, the monkeys, birds, butterflies, and all other animals went away. They stopped communicating, they stopped moving and the forest was silent. It was depressing. The thriving forest sounded and appeared empty. The realization that something so small as noise pollution made such a big impact hit me. I could just imagine what this rainforest would turn into after they started cutting roads, building towns, and drilling for oil. It would completely drive the animals off. With the direct pollution from these facilities, noise pollution from the drills, workers traveling, and towns being constructed, the forest would change drastically. The unknown noises are already starting to scare off some animals. The oil spills, that are going to happen, especially with an oil company like PetroEcuador who has a reputation for making large messes, they are going to contaminate water, and harm the people and the animals. The beautiful rainforest that I have once visited is going to become a poor, dirty oil town, where the only benefit here is for the big oil companies.

The people of a small country like Ecuador deserve the right to be heard. The biodiversity of the rainforest deserves to contain life. We need to be aware that even the small things people are doing before they go and contaminate the ecosystem are making a big impact. Walk into the forest without any cars, or machines. Look around. Enjoy the world. Then come in with your machines, and cars and make a lot of noise and look around. Realize there is nothing there. Realize that if you continue the process that there really will be nothing there. You are already killing the forest by bringing in your noise pollution. Imagine what you are going to do it when you've contaminated their waters, and animals are dying, people are getting cancer. Imagine what you can do to stop it. It may be a small thing you are doing, but it makes a big difference.

by Jillian Welch

 

PROTECT YASUNI, SAVE THE CLIMATE

Escrito por Anto Calle el . Publicado en Blog (english)

 

Les Six de Paris

The Yasuni territory in Ecuador is under pressure because of oil reserves found underneath the nature reserve. Here in Paris, Yasunidos wages action during the climate summit. Their proposal gives a voice to the local population, protects the Yasuni territory and is an answer for the global challenge of climate change.

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Ten members of the Yasuni group are waiting for us, ready to bring their story and to come out with their grievances. Grievances that have inspired the creation of Yasunidos and that lives on until today with the Ecuadorian activists and their German and Mexican counterparts.

A false promise

For years the government of Ecuador, under the leadership of president Correa, has misled the population. In 2007 Correa promised to ban oil excavation from Yasuni park, be

cause of the bio-diversity and the fourteen different tribes -each with their culture, language and knowledge — that reside here. Ecuador launched an innovative proposal. The loss of oil income for Ecuador would be compensated by the international community.

However this proposal failed. ‘The support of countries like Germany, Italy, Norway and France was deterred because Correa himself did not fully back the proposal’, says Antonella, who has been active for Yasunidos since the beginning. The Guardian published documents that show how the president was negotiating a deal with China, selling the oil under Yasuni while the innovative proposal was officially still standing.

The insincerity of the Ecuadorian president propelled the activists. Yasunidos would not stand for this, and gathered more than enough signatures (755.000) to call for a referendum over Yasuni. But the government boycotted the initiative, using dark maneuvers, while it paved the way for oil extraction from the nature reserve.

carito

Yasuni today

Today there is no major oil extraction going on in Yasuni. Investments are lacking because of low oil prices and the bad quality of oil in the territory. But the government is preparing for excavation by silencing public protest and building infrastructure. According to the Ecuadorian minister for environment oil will be flowing by 2016.

Antonella points out that different roads are already running through Yasuni. ‘For some roads up to sixty meter wide corridors were cut through the Amazon. The army stops people who want to take pictures or see what’s going on. Luckily a group of Italian scientists analyzed satellite pictures of Yasuni, on these you can see the impact of the infrastructure works. The president made a promise not to destroy more than 0,1% of the Yasuni and to only build ecological roads. But he cannot keep this promise. Everything in the Amazons is connected, you cannot destroy one part and keep another intact.’

‘Today Yasunidos is a symbol for Ecuador’, says Pato: ‘It brings people together because it touches our imagination and hearts. It is more than Yasuni, the entire country is one fragile ecosystem, everything is connected. The Paramo (a neotropical ecosystem in the high Andes) keeps rivers flowing during periods of drought and the mangroves harbor a rich wildlife diversity. All of these are under threat because they contain valuable resources, just like the oil under Yasuni. But without these ecosystems life is impossible for animals, plants and man’.

 Climate justice from below

President Correa did himself injury. Yasunidos is leaving behind the government because of Correa’s untenable promise of destroying only 0,1% of the Yasuni and his insincere backing of the international deal to keep the oil in the ground. ‘Change must come from ourselves’, that is the message of Yasunidos. Therefore they are rolling up their sleeves and activating civil society, desde el subsuelo, bottom-up.

Carolina emphasizes that indiginious rights are crucial. ‘It is not only sustainable energy production or bio-diversity that is at stake. The people that live in Yasunidos are at the heart of the matter.’ In fact,Yasunidos believes that local populations are best placed to preserve their own territory. And this goes for local communities in fragile places around the world.

 Support in Paris?

‘The solution we propose for Yasuni is a pilot project for carbon free communities around the globe’, says Antonella. Here in Paris, Yasunidos makes the move from local to global. They want to unite the voice of indigenous people from around the world. Next to the big institutionalised climate summit, Yasunidos holds lectures, debates and gatheres supporters for local communities who need money, technical assistance and like-minded people.

Yasunidos is happy with the response from people here in Paris. ‘We get a positive response, they see our proposal as a serious approach to mitigate climate change. They want to work with the proposal and spread the idea.’ But the bottom-up message is not well received by the media in Ecuador. In La Mentira de la Semana, the weekly program of president Correa, political opponents get dragged through the mud and Yasunidos is a regular guest.

 Oil interests and politics versus climate

PetroAmazones, the national oil company promises to use modern extraction techniques in Yasuni, to minimize the impact. However, the company does not have a good reputation. Between 2000 and 2008 Amazon Watch witnessed 1415 oil leaks in the Ecuadorian rainforest while PetroAmazones was working there. The clean-up has yet to begin and the consequences for nature and local populations are disastrous. Yasunidos is afraid the same consequences will be seen in Yasuni. 

 Eco-logical

In 2014 Correa analyzed the support for Yasunidos. Young people between 15 and 25 seemed to be the driving force behind the Yasuniprotection campaign. Therefore the president now aims his anti-Yasunidos media campaigns at young people and.

Pato says Correa is right about youth. ‘The most active people in Ecuador are young people. They are willing to get onto the streets and have their voices heard. Youngsters are valuable in the fight against climate change because they can be innovative, are not bound to interests and they bring alternatives into practice.’

In the long term, Correa’s economic argument to exploit oil in Yasuni does not stand. Oil excavation seems to be profitable but the numbers proof the opposite. ‘The oil could bring an export-revenue of $18 billion for Ecuador. But because of demographic growth and a growing life standard. Most of the oil would be used for internal purposes by 2035. The oil will not be exported and it will not bring the expected revenue. From an economical point of view it is therefore logical to make the transition towards renewable energy and keep the oil under the ground’, says Stefan, energy specialist of Yasunidos.

Pato ‘We must think in the long term. The fight for Yasuni started twenty years ago. Today we see many wounds in the Amazons. But without the motivation and courage of Yasunidos and all those who have stood up, Yasuni would already be gone.

 

 

Lettre ouverte pour la protection des peuples Tagaeri et Taromenan

Escrito por Anto Calle el . Publicado en Blog (english)

Lettre ouverte pour la protection des peuples Tagaeri et Taromenane

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Quito, 12 octobre 2015

LETTRE OUVERTE

Econ. Rafael Correa D.

PRESIDENT DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'EQUATEUR

Ing. Jorge Glas E.

VICE PRESIDENT DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'EQUATEUR

Dra. Lorena Tapia

MINISTRE DE L'ENVIRONNEMENT

Dra. Ledy Zúñiga R.

MINISTRE DE LA JUSTICE, DES DROITS DE L'HOMME ET DES CULTES

Madame, Monsieur,

Profondément inquiets par la remise imminente de la licence environnementale concernant le Bloc 55, mieux connu sous le nom de « Campo Armadillo », là même où sont morts Héctor España et Luis Castellanos en 2005 et 2008; là où on été récolté plus de 5000 témoignages (dont beaucoup d'entre eux sont récents) ; et là où les documents du ministère de l'environnement et le Plan des « Mesures de Précaution » reconnaissent la présence de «Peuples Indigènes en Isolement Volontaire»(PIAV) [1], nous alertons que le lancement des opérations pétrolières dans le Bloc 55, serait désastreux non seulement pour les PIAV, mais aussi pour la crédibilité de votre gouvernement et pour celle de l'institution chargée de la protection des droits des Tagaeri et des Taromenane.

Nous vous rappelons que selon les directives de la Politique Nationale des Peuples en Situation d'Isolement Volontaire, l'état doit garantir:

         - La possession ancestrale des territoires, lieux de vie de ces peuples et indispensables à leurs         activités de subsistance; ainsi que leur l'intangibilité ;

                    La mobilité de ces peuples en fonction de leurs normes culturelles;

                    La reconnaissance du fait que la présence des Tagaeri, Taromenani et des autres peuples en situation d'isolement volontaire permet la conservation de vastes parties du Parc National Yasuni;

                    que leur extermination ne soit jamais ni considéré comme un moyen pour faciliter les activités extractivistes en Amazonie, ni comme un dommage collatéral inévitable[2].

Les Directives Stratégiques pour l'Action, prévoient l'obligation de: “Renforcer le principe d'intangibilité”, et il est également mentionné comme priorité d'établir” une nouvelle organisation territoriale qui empechera la mise en place des opérations petrolières dans les zones d'affectations du territoire des Tagaeri et des Taromenani”.

En plus des recommandations du rapport de 2013 de la Commission interaméricaine des droits de l'homme concernant“les Peuples Indigènes en Isolement Volontaire et non contactés dans le continent américain, section Ressources Naturelles [3]: il est affirmé que l'état devra “s'abstenir d'octroyer des licences ou des autorisations dans le but de mener des activités relatives à l'extraction des ressources naturelles, comme par exemple les activités d'extraction minière et celles relatives aux hydrocarbures, à la déforestation ou encore à l'agro-industrie, dans les zones de présence ou de passage des peuples indigènes en situation d'isolement volontaire et non contactés.


Le respect de la loi et de la constitution implique la fermeture définitive du Bloc 55 (Armadillo), l'annulation de toutes les concession pétrolières autorisées dans cette zone, ainsi que l'élargissement de la zone intangible des Tagaeri Taromenane, par l'inclusion du Bloc 55. Et au delà, nous devons aller vers la définition d'un territoire dans le but de protéger éternellement l’intégrité et les droits humains des peuples Tagaeri et Taromenane, pour ainsi empêcher un ethnocide.

“Un puit de plus dans le parc Yasuni, un jour de moins dans l'existence des Tagaeri et des Taromenane.”


[1]Le Ministère de l'Environnement et le Ministère de la Justice, des droits de l'homme et des cultes, ont transmis en avril 2013, une carte (http://bit.ly/1LmSnht) sur laquelle est identifiée la présence de quatre groupes de PIAV, dont le “Grupo Armadillo”.


[2] Politique Nationale pour les Peuples en Situation d'Isolement Volontaire”; Gouvernement Nationale de la République d’Équateur. Pp. 6, 7      


[3]“Peuples indigènes en isolement volontaire et non contactés des Amériques”, section Ressources Naturelles”; Commission interaméricaine des droits de l'homme. Pp. 81


Je vous prie d'agréer, Madame, Monsieur l'expression de mes salutations distinguées.

 

YASunidos

Jorge Herrera

Franco Viteri 

Raúl Moscoso  

Fernando Ponce 

Ramiro Ávila Santamaría 

Alberto Acosta 

Aurora Donoso 

Julio César Trujillo     

Esperanza Martínez 

Carlos Pérez  

Elsie Monge

Alexandra Almeida 

José Proaño 

Ivonne Yánez

Milagros Aguirre

Joan Martínez Alier 

Carlos Larrea

Katy Álvarez 

Nina Gualinga             

Laura Rival

Christoph Baumann   

Carlos Andrés Vera   

Roque Sevilla

Blanca Chancoso

Nidia Arrobo

Comité de Derechos Humanos de Orellana

Walter Mena- Presidente Sociedad Ecuatoriana de Medicina Ecológica

Colectivo ARTOS de Manta

Pablo Cardoso

Daniel Pérez Creus

Ongd AFRICANDO

Rebecca Zehr

Irene Donoso Vallejo

Fernando Larrea

Vicente Martínez

Michelle Báez

Leandro Velasco

Guadalupe Rodríguez


Salva la Selva

Philip Gondecki

Charlotte Gengenbach

José Gabriel Rivas Ducca, biólogo-ecologista- Costa Rica

Julio César Maya G.- Corporación La Ceiba

Blandine Gravelin

Jorge Corral

Emilio Chong-  ActivismoGlobal

Movimiento Ecologista de Mujeres del Sur

Comité de Derechos Humanos de Orellana

Cabildo por las Mujeres de Cuenca

Yasunid@s - Guapondelig

Frente por la Salud de los Pueblos – Azuay

Fernando Pico

Alessandra Dirani Aguilar

María José Racines

Econ. Diana Sharom Cabrera Montecé MSc.
Drte. Ciencias Económicas
Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana – México

Carmen Seco Pérez

Aída Quinatoa

María Moreno de los Ríos

Alfredo E.Calcagno – Argentina

Alfred Henkel - Alemania

Fausto Valero Alvarez - Ballenita Sí . Organización Comunitaria

Verónica Potes

 


 

 

Offener Brief zum Schutz der Völker Tagaeri und Taromenane

Escrito por Anto Calle el . Publicado en Blog (english)

 

                                                                                   Quito, den 12. Oktober 2015

 


- DEUTSCHE VERSION -


An

Rafael Correa D., Präsident der Republik Ecuador,
Jorge Glas E., Vizepräsident der Republik Ecuador,
Lorena Tapia, Umweltministerin der Republik Ecuador,
Ledy Zúñiga R., Ministerin für Justiz, Menschenrechte und Kulte


Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren,

wir sind tief besorgt über die unmittelbar bevorstehende Vergabe der sog. „Umweltlizenz“ für den Block 55 [im Yasuní Nationalpark, Anm. Übers.], besser bekannt als den Block, „Amardillo“  durch das ecuadorianische Umweltministerium (MAE1) zur Erdölförderung in diesem Ölfeld – einem [konfliktiven, Anm. Übers.] Gebiet, in dem es zu dem Tod von Héctor España (2005) und Luis Castellanos (2008) kam.
Es existieren über 5000 Zeugnisse, die die Präsenz von „indigenen Völkern in freiwilliger Isolation“2 in dieser Zone bestätigen.
Selbst die Dokumente des MAE und des „Vorsichtsmaßnahmenplans“ der Regierung erkennen dies an.

Wir warnen ausdrücklich vor Erdölaktivitäten in diesem Bereich des Erdölblocks 55. Sie wären fatal sowohl für die indigenen Völker in freiwilliger Isolation als auch für die Glaubwürdigkeit ihrer Regierung und die Institutionalisierung der Rechte von indigenen Stämmen wie den Tagaeri und Taromenane.

Wir erinnern daran, dass der Staat gemäß den Richtlinien der „Nationalen Politik der Völker in freiwilliger Isolation“3 zu Folgendem verpflichtet ist:
    •    der Garantie, dass die indigenen Völker Besitzer ihrer Territorien bleiben, die sie bewohnen und subsistenzwirtschaftlich bearbeiten und dass ihre „Unberührbarkeit“ unangetastet bleibt;
    •    der Garantie ihrer Bewegungsfreiheit gemäß ihrer kultureller Gepflogenheiten als Nomadenvölker;
    •    der Anerkennung der Tatsache, dass sich durch die Anwesenheit der Tagaeri und Taromenane;
    •    sowie anderer Völker in freiwilliger Isolation große Teile des Yasuní-Nationalparks in einem gut erhaltenen Zustand befinden;
    •    der Garantie, dass ihre „Ausrottung niemals als legitimes Mittel für Ressourcenausbeutung im Amazonas oder unvermeidlichen Kollateralschaden in Betracht gezogen werden wird“

Die strategischen Aktionslinien der Regierung („Líneas Estratégicas para la Acción“) verpflichten des Weiteren zu der „Konsolidierung und Stärkung des Prinzips der Unantastbarkeit“.
Als Priorität wird dort weiterhin genannt: „das Vorantreiben eines künftigen gesetzlichen Regelwerks für Territorialfragen, welches Erdölförderaktivitäten in den von den Tagaeri und Taromenane beeinflussten und bewohnten Gebieten unterbindet.


Weiterhin sind die Empfehlungen der Interamerikanischen Menschenrechtskommission in ihrem Bericht von 2013 über die „indigenen Völker in freiwilliger Isolation und Erstkontakt in den Amerikas“4 zu beachten. Im Abschnitt über die natürlichen Ressourcen erklärt die Kommission, dass „die Lizenzvergabe oder Autorisierung zur Realisierung von Aktivitäten, verbunden mit der Extraktion von natürlichen Ressourcen wie Bergbau, Erdölförderung, Abholzung, Viehwirtschaft und  Agrarindustrie, in den Lebens- und Bewegungsräumen sowie Schutzgebieten von indigenen Völkern in freiwilliger Isolation und Erstkontakt verweigert werden muss“.   

Die logische, angemessene, korrekte und dem Gesetz sowie der Verfassung entsprechende Konsequenz ist die definitive Schließung des Blocks 55 (Armadillo), die Annullierung der ausgestellten Konzession sowie die Ausweitung der „unantastbaren Zone der Tagaeri und Taromenane“ bis einschließlich des Blocks 55 und darüber hinaus die Festlegung weiteren Territoriums, das die Unversehrtheit der indigenen Völker in freiwilliger Isolation gewährleistet, ihre Menschenrechte schützt und sie so vor einem unmittelbar bevorstehenden Etnozid bewahrt.


Eine Ölplattform mehr im Yasuní, bedeutet einen Tag weniger für die Existenz der Tagaeri und Taromenane.


Mit freundlichen Grüßen

 

 

YASunidos

Jorge Herrera

Franco Viteri 

Raúl Moscoso  

Fernando Ponce 

Ramiro Ávila Santamaría 

Alberto Acosta 

Aurora Donoso 

Julio César Trujillo     

Esperanza Martínez 

Carlos Pérez  

Elsie Monge

Alexandra Almeida 

José Proaño 

Ivonne Yánez

Milagros Aguirre

Joan Martínez Alier 

Carlos Larrea

Katy Álvarez 

Nina Gualinga             

Laura Rival

Christoph Baumann   

Carlos Andrés Vera   

Roque Sevilla

Blanca Chancoso

Nidia Arrobo

Comité de Derechos Humanos de Orellana

Walter Mena- Presidente Sociedad Ecuatoriana de Medicina Ecológica

Colectivo ARTOS de Manta

Pablo Cardoso

Daniel Pérez Creus

Ongd AFRICANDO

Rebecca Zehr

Irene Donoso Vallejo

Fernando Larrea

Vicente Martínez

Michelle Báez

Leandro Velasco

Guadalupe Rodríguez


Salva la Selva

Philip Gondecki

Charlotte Gengenbach

José Gabriel Rivas Ducca, biólogo-ecologista- Costa Rica

Julio César Maya G.- Corporación La Ceiba

Blandine Gravelin

Jorge Corral

Emilio Chong-  ActivismoGlobal

Movimiento Ecologista de Mujeres del Sur

Comité de Derechos Humanos de Orellana

Cabildo por las Mujeres de Cuenca

Yasunid@s - Guapondelig

Frente por la Salud de los Pueblos – Azuay

Fernando Pico

Alessandra Dirani Aguilar

María José Racines

Econ. Diana Sharom Cabrera Montecé MSc.
Drte. Ciencias Económicas
Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana – México

Carmen Seco Pérez

Aída Quinatoa

María Moreno de los Ríos

Alfredo E.Calcagno – Argentina

Alfred Henkel - Alemania

Fausto Valero Alvarez - Ballenita Sí . Organización Comunitaria

Verónica Potes

Rebeca Donoso C.

Sara Silva Rodríguez 

Melissa Moreano

Victoria Carrasco

Eugenio Bayancela

Rafael Vasconez

María Belén Moncayo

Miriam Hinkelman, United Staes of America

Sandra Flemisch

Eulalia Carrasco Andrade

Sara Cordeon

 Chloé Mecqinion

Jorge Iván Reyes

 

 

The Beauty and Biodiversity of The Amazon

Escrito por Anto Calle el . Publicado en Blog (english)

When you think of the rainforest, you think of beautiful plants and a variety of animals. When I first stepped into the jungle, a crow greeted my group, welcoming us into its home. Being in the rainforest is like being in a whole new world. You smell the mist in the air and feel the humidity. You smell the damp ground below your feet and hear the insects flying about. There is always something interesting to see whether it be a plant, or animal. There was even a night that my group was lucky enough to see a most astounding sunset. The colors were made up of pinks, oranges and purples. The colors grew stronger as the night grew later and at some point, there was a hole in the clouds that the sun peeked through shining beautiful rays of color.

baja calidad

The Amazon Rainforest is home to more than 40,000 species of plants, 16,000 tree species, 3,100 bird species, 430 plus mammals species, 1,000 amphibians species, and 400 plus reptile species making it one the most biodiverse areas in the world. When I was in the Amazon Rainforest I felt a sense of peace because everything felt so cheerful and alive. There was an experience waiting to happen around every corner. Around one corner, there was a baby Anaconda, and around another there was a butterfly.

My group stayed at the Yasuni Ecolodge in the Amazon. It was a very enjoyable experience because everyone was so kind and caring and joyful to know that we were so interested in the place they called home. You can feel the sense of pride that these locals take in their part of the jungle. I recommend visiting the Amazon Rainforest if there is an opportunity to do so. Anticipate adventure, smiling a lot and making new friends, while learning the culture and history of this greatly biodiverse area of the world. This place is so special because it is home to so many plants, animals, and over 940,000 indigenous people alone. If we are to continue to enjoy the beauty and the diversity of this planet the Amazon should be kept free of oil exploration and pollution for years to come.

By: Madeline Hale-Mounier